Happy Holidays on Behalf of Bowi & Mali

This year I am happy to wish you Merry Christmas and a wonderful holiday season via Bowi & Mali, the two main characters of a new educational series I’ve been working on for the past months. Contrary to prior content I’ve developed (such as the Ericzone Podcast), this latest original production was created with preschoolers and their parents in mind. I very much look forward to revealing the episodes and to share the wonder I feel when I watch this imaginary universe come to life. For the time being, I won’t go into too many details about the production. I will reveal a bit more once the bilingual videos are available online. For the moment, I need to thank voice talent and artist Bridget Jaune for her contribution and to thank Allison Ewert at Very Happy Puppets. Also many thanks to Annik Beauchemin and Amélie Marcotte who pushed the project in the right pedagogical direction. I would also like to thank all of you who keep an eye out for my posts on social media. Your encouragements mean the world to me and I value your feedback at all times. I am truly inspired simply by knowing that you pay attention to my work. Thank you for any and all comments and messages you send my way. I am truly humbled whenever you share my content to your network. My main motivation has always been to know that I manage to make people smile and to bring some positive feelings into their lives. The Bowi & Mali educational series is exactly what I hope to achieve through my art and my professional career in audiovisual content creation in marketing. That is why the holiday wishes in this video bring extra warmth to my heart.

Happy holidays everybody! And like Ti-Mousse would say: ”Hold on to your hats! There’s a big snow storm coming! Ooh boy!

Thank you everyone for following my blog and to offer your encouragement! If you haven’t done so already, I strongly invite you to visit the Bowi & Mali Facebook page and to click ”Like”. Please visit the Bowi & Mali YouTube page and to click ”Subscribe”. Hit the notification bell in order to receive notifications when new videos are published. Bowi & Mali are also on Instagram.

For more articles about my work on educational content projects for kids, have a look at this page
For more information and articles, have a look at my portfolio index

If you would like to know more about my art, you can find my portfolio on ArtStationBehance and on Deviantart. As always, I invite you view my official website www.ericzone.com and visit my Facebook page. Don’t forget to click “Like”. Have a look at my art on Instagram. You can also find me on YouTubeEriczone is on Instagram. Did you send me an invitation to connect via LinkedIn?

Visit the Ericzone Podcast page on Facebook or BaladoQuebec.com. The show is available on Apple Podcasts and Stitcher. I invite you to visit the Ericzone Podcast photo album on Flickr.

http://www.youtube.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.facebook.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.instagram.com/ericzonecompodcast
http://www.ericzone.com
http://www.ericzone.wordpress.com
http://www.twitter.com/ericzonecom

Advertisement

Bon temps des fêtes de Bowi & Mali

Cette année, j’ai l’immense plaisir de vous souhaiter un très beau temps des fêtes par le biais de Bowi & Mali! Ces deux petits personnages sont les vedettes d’une série web éducative originale qui est destinée aux enfants en bas âge et leurs parents. Voilà plusieurs mois que je travaille sur ce projet incroyable et j’ai bien hâte de vous montrer tous ces épisodes à venir très prochainement. Pour l’instant, je n’irai pas trop en détails pour parler du projet. Je vous réserve un autre article à la sortie de cette série bilingue, réalisée en français et anglais avec une touche d’espagnol (merci Rosa chez ECOL). Pour le moment, je dois tout de même remercier l’artiste Bridget Jaune pour sa contribution et saluer Allison Ewert chez Very Happy Puppets. Merci également à Annik Beauchemin et Amélie Marcotte, sans qui le projet n’aurait pas pu démarrer dans la bonne direction. Je vais également prendre le temps de remercier tous ceux qui gardent un oeil sur mon travail par le biais des réseaux sociaux. Merci pour vos encouragements et vos suggestions! Vous n’avez pas idée combien ça m’inspire de savoir que vous portez attention à mon travail. Vos retours comptent beaucoup pour moi! J’apprécie toujours vos messages et vos commentaires. Ça me fait un immense plaisir quand vous partagez mes publications artistiques et professionnelles. Ma motivation principale a toujours été de savoir que je parviens à faire sourire le monde autour de moi et d’apporter un peu de positif dans leurs journées. Le projet Bowi & Mali est exactement ce que j’espère accomplir par le biais de mon art et ma carrière de créateur de contenu audiovisuel en marketing. Voilà pourquoi ce court extrait vidéo me fait d’autant plus plaisir.

Bon temps des fêtes tout le monde! Et comme dirait Ti-Mousse: «Attache ta tuque! Y va avoir une tempête aujourd’hui! Eh oui!»

Merci tout le monde de suivre mon blogue et de m’encourager comme vous le faites! Si ça n’est pas fait, je vous invite fortement à visiter la page Facebook de Bowi & Mali et de cliquer «Like». Merci d’aller voir la page YouTube et cliquer «Subscribe». Cochez la petite cloche pour recevoir les avertissements lorsque les vidéos sont publiées. Bowi & Mali sont également sur Instagram.

Comme toujours, je vous invite à consulter ma page officielle www.ericzone.com et à visiter ma page Facebook. N’oubliez pas d’y cliquer «Like»Vous pouvez également me trouver sur YouTube. Pour voir mon art, visitez Ericzone Art sur InstagramDeviantartBehance et Artstation. M’avez-vous envoyé une demande de connexion via LinkedIn ?

Ericzone Podcast est disponible sur FacebookBaladoQuebec.com et Apple Podcasts. L’émission est également disponible sur YouTube et Stitcher. Je vous invite à visiter l’album photo du Ericzone Podcast sur Flickr.

http://www.youtube.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.facebook.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.instagram.com/ericzonecompodcast
http://www.ericzone.com
http://www.ericzone.wordpress.com
http://www.twitter.com/ericzonecom

Quality Control and Marketing: The Dawn of Video Games at Ubisoft Montreal

Cliquez ici pour la version en français

It seems like yesterday that I walked those creaking wood floors at Ubisoft Montreal. I still recall the heavy ventilation system which hung from the ceiling and the kilometres of colourful network cables that followed me along the corridors of the old Peck building. In truth, It always made me feel like I was in the rebel base on Hoth. Considering the winters we get here in Quebec, it wasn’t much of a stretch of the imagination. Geek jokes apart, It did feel like Ubisoft was mobilising beyond all expectations. Back in 2004, the company was the underdog of the industry. We were a rebel army of gamers who, for the most part, were connected through a mutual passion and our love of Montreal. It was no small feat. Mostly young and taking first steps in our professional careers, we all wanted to find our place, to prove ourselves and take down an AT-AT Walker. Ok, no more Star Wars references, I promise. Looking back on this period of my life, I feel fortunate to have been there. It was a unique moment in the history of Quebec and it undoubtedly shaped the person I am today. Had it not been for those formative years in the gaming industry, I wouldn’t be the audiovisual specialist, podcaster and marketing artist I am today.

Video games have always ignited my imagination and constantly lured me back to my controller. I’m a 100% geek at the core. Even today, If I’m not playing games, I will spend hours watching YouTube videos about games. As far as I can go back, I wanted to create my own video game. So, it made sense, when I completed my studies in Multimedia, that I would go knock at the door of Ubisoft Montreal. Back then, the building didn’t have any security gates, so I just walked in and sparked a conversation with someone working there. I will forever be grateful to this random person who eventually brought my resume to HR and spoke on my behalf. On my first day at the job, I couldn’t believe where I was. I remember that I had to pinch myself to snap out of it. I had this unbelievable feeling that I was finally home and that, more importantly, anything was possible.

The great people in one of Ubisoft Montreal’s Quality Control teams, sometime in 2005


Quality Control 2004-2007

I first started in the quality control team, surrounded by the amazing people who tested those first classic games published by Ubisoft Montreal. True video game testers are meta human. I don’t know if it’s still the case but, at the time, being on the quality control team meant that you were a contract worker. It also meant that if you didn’t put in the effort or the extra hours, your place wasn’t assured. It’s in this context of survival of the fittest that the true die hard gamers stood out and kept playing, even during their breaks. I’m proud to say that I was one of those unstoppable freaks that gave it their all. Although, I will admit that I did tap out once during production ‘crunch time’, after a 21 hour marathon of Prince of Persia: Warrior Within. Going above and beyond allowed me to always get my contract renewed. I look back on those years with a profound sense of accomplishment.
My efforts were acknowledged through my hard work and I became an asset to the core team of Quality control. Or maybe it was just my basic grasp baby foot or my rudimentary Hacky sack abilities that people liked. I do remember that my animated GIFs were especially appreciated by the team of programmers. Explaining the ‘reproduction’ steps of a ‘bug’ with a static image was never an easy task. I don’t recall why we couldn’t just send a video of the problem caught in the act. Perhaps it was just a limitation with earlier iterations of the JIRA database. In any case, I did the next best thing to communicate the information visually. Even today, It is still something that I thrive to do in my line of work in marketing. To communicate with my utmost capacity.

Marketing 2007-2011

I was so intimidated when I sat in front of producer Jade Raymond. I still don’t know how I gathered the courage to simply go up to her to talk about my interest in video editing. In any case, not only did she take the time to watch the Assassin’s Creed fan trailer I had edited in my spare time, but she sent it to the right people. I will forever be grateful for her kindness. I felt as though I was floating when I read the email summoning me to the marketing department. Although there was no opening for a video editor, they were on the lookout for a screenshot artist. I was already comfortable with Photoshop at that point in my life, so I gladly accepted this job offer. Even though it took me a few weeks to get used to the learning curve, I eventually grasped the workflow and enjoyed being a communication artist. I have, since then mastered, Photoshop and still feel at home editing photos and being a graphic designer.

After a few changes in the department, I was given a bit more leg room and my first video editing mandates. I proudly look back on my Assassin’s Creed trailers and I am amazed at how many people have watched them on YouTube. Cinephile at the core, I went about these mandates with the eye of a movie director, making sure the camera tracking had proper movie composition, as well as multiple angles. I even added the Wilhelm scream in some of my trailers, as a nod to George Lucas, a person who had influenced me on a level I still haven’t fully grasped. The bit of comedy with the bards getting grabbed by Ezio at the very end was also my doing. I learned a lot from each and every person in that marketing department. I have cherished memories of moments I shared with everybody. Thank you.


The Ubisoft Universe

I can’t even begin to describe how it felt to work at Ubisoft, surrounded by so many creative people. I couldn’t help but allow the atmosphere to inspire me to grow in my own right. In my spare time, I would familiarise myself with my Wacom tablet, write the stories for my video game concepts and create composite imagery. Using photos, 3D elements and my drawings, I eventually conceived an elaborate storyboard video based on a story concept I had written about the Sandwraith. The latter, is a Prince of Persia character who had infinite potential for a spinoff. In spite of the fact that no one shared my hopes for the character, I was grateful to have been given the opportunity to show my video producers and to Corey May, writer behind Assassin’s Creed. Although the game project wasn’t possible, I was humbled to learn that my storytelling skills had been appreciated. The Sandwraith concept video suddenly paved the way to an avenue I hadn’t even considered. It was then that I was offered a job on a writing team, separate from marketing. For reasons I still don’t fully understand, I declined the offer and decided to stay in the marketing team. Looking back, I think I felt devoted to my team and thought I would betray them if I left. I was also torn at the ideas of never being able to produce video game trailers or work with Photoshop to create visual assets.

Back then, there was another project I had conceived that probably influenced my decision to turn down this slight career change. For months now, in my spare time, I had been working on the designs for a CMO database I simply called ”The Ubisoft Universe”. In true quality control fashion, I had noticed the issues that constantly hindered the workflow and prevented quick access to updated content. That’s when I set about finding solutions. Inspired by the latest ”cloud” technology, Facebook, Marvel comics and Wiki websites, I envisioned an interactive platform that would connect Ubisoft across the planet. This project brought under the same roof everything that I had learned over the years at quality control and marketing. Both worlds were coming together as I designed a carefully crafted interface meant to inspire others in the same way the games had stimulated my imagination. I then patched up an interactive demo in HTML with Dreamweaver and set off on a mission to reveal my concept.
I’ve always been an ideator; someone with an imagination that brings solutions to the table. And so, after my interactive database concept was approved, I started to work with some programmers to develop a functional version of the ”Ubisoft Universe”. Once in place, the tool would enhance communication, simplify access to updated assets, facilitate the workflow and stimulate creativity. I always felt that ”Wiki” pages fell short in the context of a creative production environment that was spread across multiple offices around the planet. This ground breaking tool would not only alleviate production woes, but had the potential for a public counterpart specifically built to promote Ubisoft and its expanding intellectual properties. Along with my Sandwraith game concept, I wanted ”Ubisoft Universe” to pave the way to a cross-IP universe, directly inspired by Marvel who, at the time was setting up phase one of their lucrative MCU. Thank you to the great people who worked on this with me, all the way from Ubisoft Romania. I learned a great deal from you and I’m sorry I forgot your names. You hold a special place in my thoughts.

2011 Onwards: Beyond Those Walls

It was with a heavy heart that I left Ubisoft Montreal in February of 2011. Even though my soul was with the company and the wonderful people who worked there, I needed to pursue other dreams. Among those was my desire to record music in my studio, become an artist and to make documentary films. To do so, i had to get out there, build my network and learn new skills. Concerned with the growing problems of our planet, I was fortunate to find a calling in socially conscious marketing. Now a freelancer, I offered the skills I had developed over the past few years for new clients such as Wapikoni Mobile. I eventually crossed paths with Pierre Blackburn and did some editing related to the arts and the LGBTQ community. Along with Pierre, we also worked on an cool music video and got into podcasting. I also went back to school at Musitechnic and obtained my diploma in audio techniques. This opened the door to many other great professional experiences in the realm of audiovisual production. After years away from the game industry, I am still an avid gamer. It is with great pride that I look back on that era, at the beginning of the multimedia revolution in Montreal. Makes me wonder why I never went back. Thanks for all the years.

For more information about me, you can find my art portfolio on ArtStationBehance and on Deviantart. As always, I invite you view my official website www.ericzone.com and visit my Facebook page. Don’t forget to click “Like”. Have a look at my art on Instagram. You can also find me on YouTubeEriczone is on Instagram. Did you send me an invitation to connect via LinkedIn?

Visit the Ericzone Podcast page on Facebook or BaladoQuebec.com. The show is available on Apple Podcasts and Stitcher. I invite you to visit the Ericzone Podcast photo album on Flickr.

For more information and articles, have a look at my portfolio index

http://www.youtube.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.facebook.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.instagram.com/ericzonecompodcast
http://www.ericzone.com
http://www.ericzone.wordpress.com
http://www.twitter.com/ericzonecom

Contrôle qualité et marketing: L’aube de l’industrie du jeu vidéo chez Ubisoft Montreal

Click here for english version

J’ai l’impression que c’était hier que je marchais le long des couloirs de l’ancien édifice Peck, dans lequel réside aujourd’hui Ubisoft Montréal. Je me souviens encore de l’immense système de ventilation accroché au plafond et des kilomètres de câbles réseaux qui semblaient vouloir me guider vers mon bureau. En vérité, cette ambiance m’a souvent invité à imaginer que j’étais sur la planète Hoth dans la base rebelle de Star Wars. Considérant les hivers ardus auxquels on a droit ici au Québec, ça n’était pas si loin de la vérité. Même si nous n’étions pas sur le point d’être attaqués par l’Empire, nous étions toutefois animés par cette mobilisation contre toute attente. En 2004, malgré les premiers succès, il restait encore du travail pour que le bureau à Montréal confirme sa place dans l’industrie. Nous étions, en quelque sorte, une armée de « gamers » qui s’était réunie par le biais d’une passion des jeux et un amour pour le Québec. La plupart d’entre nous étant encore jeunes, nous n’en étions qu’à nos premiers moments dans nos carrières et n’avions pas encore maîtrisé la force. Je vous promets que je ne ferai plus de références à Star Wars. Avec un peu d’introspection, je me rends compte de cette chance incroyable, que d’avoir été parmi ceux qui étaient là, à l’aube du multimédia au Québec. Cette époque importante dans l’histoire a façonné la personne que je suis. Si ça n’avait pas été de ces années formatives dans l’industrie du jeu vidéo, je ne serais jamais devenu spécialiste en audiovisuel, podcaster et artiste en communication.

Depuis toujours, les jeux vidéo alimentent mon imagination et me ramènent constamment à mes manettes de jeu. Je n’ai aucune honte à afficher mes couleurs de «geek». Encore aujourd’hui, si je ne suis pas en train de jouer, je serai sûrement en train d’écouter des vidéos YouTube au sujet des plus récents jeux. Dans mes souvenirs les plus lointains, je me rappelle avoir rêvé qu’un jour j’inventerais mon propre jeu vidéo. Il était donc logique qu’après mes études en multimédia, j’aille cogner à la porte d’Ubisoft Montréal. À l’époque, l’édifice n’avait pas encore de barrières de sécurité. Je me sentis donc un peu moins coupable d’infiltrer les lieux, tel un véritable assassin qui se fond dans le décor, et d’initier la conversation avec quelques employés. Je serai éternellement reconnaissant envers ce parfait inconnu qui m’a offert quelques minutes de son temps. Ce dernier est éventuellement allé porter mon CV aux Ressources humaines, faisant part de mon envie de travailler pour la compagnie. Je croyais rêver à mon premier jour de travail et il fallut même me pincer pour me ramener à la réalité de ce moment important. J’étais épris d’une sensation étonnante, comme si j’arrivais à bon port et que tout devenait maintenant possible.

The great people in one of Ubisoft Montreal’s Quality Control teams, sometime in 2005


Contrôle qualité 2004-2007

Mon introduction à l’industrie du jeu vidéo se fît par la porte d’entrée qui menait au studio de contrôle qualité. J’étais maintenant en compagnie de certaines personnes qui étaient là depuis le début, lors des lancements des premiers grands classiques publiés par Ubisoft Montréal. En vérité, le testeur de jeu est un méta humain. Je ne sais pas si c’est encore le cas, mais à l’époque, travailler au département CQ voulait dire qu’il fallait s’habituer aux incertitudes du travail à contrat. Ceci voulait aussi dire que la personne qui ne parvenait pas à donner les efforts surhumains nécessaires, n’était pas assurée d’une place pour le projet subséquent. C’est dans ces contextes que les vrais durs à cuire se démarquent et continuent de jouer, même pendant leurs pauses. C’est à cette époque que je me suis mis à boire du café afin de garder la cadence et pour ne pas rater ma chance. Je dois toutefois avouer qu’il m’est arrivé de tirer ma révérence une fois, à la suite d’un marathon de 21 heures à jouer à Prince of Persia: Warrior Within. Mis à part ce moment de faiblesse, je suis parvenu à me démarquer à chaque nouveau projet et j’ai poursuivi mon évolution. Je pense à ces années avec fierté et le sentiment d’accomplissement.

Par le biais de mes efforts, mon travail était reconnu et je suis devenu un des engrenages dans la machine efficace du contrôle qualité chez Ubisoft Montréal. Peut-être était-ce aussi ma poignée de main au baby foot ou bien ma flexibilité rudimentaire au hacky qu’on a su apprécier. Je me souviens qu’on m’avait dit qu’en plus de mes textes, mes GIF animés étaient appréciés par les gens de la programmation. Il n’est pas évident d’expliquer un «bug» par le biais d’une image. Être testeur ne voulait pas seulement dire qu’on devait jouer de longues heures, il fallait aussi être capable de décrire les situations inusitées qu’il nous arrivait souvent de croiser. Souvent, il n’était pas facile de décrire les étapes de reproduction d’un «bug» avec une simple description. Si je me souviens, on enregistrait nos tests afin de capter les problèmes en flagrant délit. Par contre, l’outil vidéo n’était pas encore au point, sans doute à cause d’une limite d’espace sur les serveurs ou bien de restrictions dans les premières versions de la base de données JIRA. Peu importe la raison, je décidai de développer ma propre méthode qui me permit de communiquer l’information clairement grâce aux GIF animés. Cette anecdote reflète bien ma quête d’innovation et de compréhension des outils médiatiques. Encore aujourd’hui, ma capacité à communiquer est une qualité indispensable dans mon travail en marketing.

Marketing 2007-2011

Vous n’avez pas idée comment j’étais intimidé d’être assis devant la productrice Jade Raymond. Je ne sais toujours pas comment je suis parvenu à m’approcher de son bureau pour lui parler de mon intérêt pour les jeux et le montage vidéo. Malgré tout, elle a non seulement pris le temps pour visionner mon «fan trailer de Assassin’s Creed», mais elle le fit parvenir aux bonnes personnes par la suite. Je serai à tout jamais reconnaissant pour son empathie. J’ai cru que j’allais m’envoler lorsque j’ai reçu le courriel pour me convoquer au département de marketing. Quoiqu’il n’y ait pas eu de poste ouvert pour un monteur vidéo, on était à la recherche d’un «screenshot artist». J’étais heureusement très à l’aise avec Photoshop, alors j’ai accepté l’offre avec plaisir. Même s’il m’a fallu quelques semaines pour gravir la courbe d’apprentissage, j’ai éventuellement apprivoisé le rythme et su apprécier mon nouveau rôle d’artiste en communication. J’ai depuis maîtrisé Photoshop et je me sens comme un poisson dans l’eau lorsque j’édite des photos et que je fais de la conception graphique.

Après quelques changements dans le département, on m’a donné encore plus d’espace pour manœuvrer, ainsi que mes premiers mandats de montage vidéo. C’est avec fierté que je visionne la plupart de mes bandes-annonces, surtout celles en lien avec le projet Assassin’s Creed. Je suis toujours étonné par le nombre de personnes qui ont vu les vidéos sur lesquelles j’ai travaillé. Grand cinéphile, j’ai assuré ces mandats avec l’œil aiguisé d’un réalisateur de films. Mon parcours en arts et mes années à me familiariser avec la direction vidéo allaient maintenant me servir. J’étais conscient de l’importance du mouvement fluide de la caméra, de la bonne composition d’image et d’une utilisation dynamique d’angles de caméra. Pour couronner le tout, il m’est arrivé de dissimuler le fameux Wilhelm scream, parmi les effets spéciaux et la musique. C’était pour moi, une façon de rendre hommage au travail de George Lucas, ce grand homme du cinéma qui a eu un impact indéniable sur moi. Également dans certaines de mes bandes-annonces, il y avait parfois cette finale, après les crédits, dans laquelle on s’amusait avec Ezio aux dépens des bardes. Les commentaires sont unanimes. Ces finales d’après crédit ont beaucoup été appréciées par la communauté. J’ai beaucoup appris de chaque personne que j’ai côtoyée dans le département marketing. Je n’ai que des souvenirs agréables que je partage avec chacun de vous. Merci.


L’Univers Ubisoft

Je ne sais pas comment je pourrais vous décrire la sensation de travailler chez Ubisoft, entouré par tous ces gens créatifs. Je n’ai pu faire autrement que de me laisser transporter par l’ambiance et m’inspirer à grandir dans ma propre créativité. Tout en me familiarisant avec ma nouvelle tablette Wacom et concevant des images de synthèse, je me suis mis à écrire les histoires pour des concepts de jeux qui me venaient à l’esprit. Utilisant photos, éléments 3D et mes illustrations, j’ai réalisé une vidéo storyboard qui raconte l’histoire derrière un concept de jeu inspiré par le Sandwraith. J’ai vu en ce personnage, tiré de la série Prince of Persia, le potentiel incroyable pour un éventuel «spinoff». Quoique personne ait partagé mon inspiration, je suis encore reconnaissant d’avoir eu l’opportunité de présenter mon concept à plusieurs producteurs, ainsi qu’à Corey May, écrivain derrière Assassin’s Creed. Somme toute, même si le projet était impossible, on me fît part de mon potentiel pour l’écriture. Ma vidéo du concept Sandwraith m’a soudainement donné accès à une porte que je n’avais pas pensé ouvrir. On m’a même offert un poste en écriture, à l’extérieur du département marketing. Pour une raison que j’ignore, j’ai décidé de refuser gracieusement l’offre et d’opter pour le montage vidéo et la conception graphique. Avec un peu d’introspection, j’admets avoir ressenti de la culpabilité à l’idée de quitter mon poste. Je me suis même senti un peu égoïste de contempler cette trahison de quitter subitement mon entourage. J’étais déchiré par ces deux avenues de carrière qui s’offraient à moi.

À l’époque, j’étais préoccupé par cet autre projet qui a sûrement influencé ma décision vis-à-vis de mon changement de carrière. Quelques mois auparavant, il m’était venu l’idée de concevoir une base de données que j’ai baptisée «Ubisoft Universe». C’est au cours de plusieurs semaines, pendant mes temps libres, que je me suis mis au travail pour développer ce projet d’envergure. En majeure partie à cause de mon instinct de testeur de jeu vidéo, j’étais devenu très sensible aux obstacles à la production, telle que l’accessibilité au contenu mis à jour. Dès lors, j’ai réfléchi pour trouver des solutions. Inspiré par la technologie du «cloud», Facebook, Marvel et les sites web Wiki, j’ai envisagé une plateforme interactive qui pourrait connecter Ubisoft à l’international. Ce projet joignait tout ce que j’avais appris pendant mes années au contrôle qualité et dans le département marketing. déroulement des opérations bloquaient dérangeait le travail et l’accessibilité au contenu mis à jour. Ces deux univers s’unissaient dans la conception d’un interface qui avait pour objectif d’inspirer mes comparses, de la même manière que tous ces jeux avaient inspiré mon imagination. Par la suite, j’ai créé une démo en HTML avec Dreamweaver et je me donnais comme objectif de révéler mon concept et de le faire approuver. J’ai toujours été un idéateur; quelqu’un avec de l’imagination qui apporte des solutions à la table. Mon concept fût éventuellement approuvé et je me mis donc au travail, en compagnie de programmeurs, pour créer une version fonctionnelle de «Ubisoft Universe». Une fois en place, cet outil permettrait d’accroître la communication en simplifiant l’accès aux données, stimulant la créativité, pour ainsi faciliter le déroulement de la production. Quoiqu’utile à certains égards, le Wiki ne parvenait pas à combler les besoins grandissants d’un nombre croissant de bureaux éparpillés autour de la planète. L’outil novateur «Ubisoft Universe» permettrait non seulement d’alléger les étapes de production, mais ouvrirait la porte à une éventuelle version de l’outil qui serait adaptée pour le grand public. Parallèlement à mon concept de jeu Sandwraith, je souhaitais que ces projets ouvrent la porte au potentiel de lier les différentes propriétés intellectuelles de Ubisoft. En guise d’exemple, je n’ai qu’à vous mentionner Marvel qui a inauguré en 2008 la première phase du «MCU» avec le lancement du film «Iron Man». Je tiens à remercier ces gens fantastiques qui ont travaillé avec moi, parfois même depuis les bureaux d’Ubisoft en Roumanie. J’ai beaucoup appris de nos intéraction et je m’excuse d’avoir oublié vos noms. Vous avez un endroit privilégié dans mes souvenirs.

Après 2011: Au delà des murs

C’est avec le cœur lourd que j’ai quitté Ubisoft au mois de février 2011. Malgré que mon amour pour l’industrie était encore présent, je devais néanmoins partir à la conquête d’autres rêves. Parmi ceux-ci, je souhaitais un jour enregistrer de la musique dans mon studio, devenir un artiste et produire des films documentaires. Pour y arriver, je devais sortir de ma zone de confort, bâtir mon réseau et acquérir de nouvelles compétences. Attristé par les problèmes de notre monde, j’étais motivé de me présenter comme professionnel dans le domaine du marketing à conscience sociale. Maintenant travailleur autonome, j’ai développé mon image de marque «Ericzone» et trouvé des clients tels que Wapikoni Mobile. Je croisai le chemins du producteur Pierre Blackburn, pour qui je réalisai le montage de plusieurs vidéos en lien avec la culture et la communité LGBTQ. En compagnie de Pierre, nous avons également réalisé un superbe vidéo-clip et travaillé sur une émission web: Le Blackburn Podcast.  Je suis aussi retourné aux études et j’ai reçu un diplôme en techniques audio chez Musitechic. Ajouter ces expériences à mon CV m’a permis d’ouvrir la porte à plusieurs associations en production audiovisuelle. Après plusieurs années loin de l’industrie du jeu, je reste un grand «gamer». C’est avec fierté que je contemple cette époque, à l’aube de la révolution des communications et du multimédia à Montréal. Ça me fait réfléchir à la raison pour laquelle je n’y suis jamais retourné. Merci à vous tous pour cette expérience inoubliable.

Souhaitez-vous en connaître davantage sur ma carrière? Consultez l’index de mon portfolio.

Comme toujours, je vous invite à consulter ma page officielle www.ericzone.com et à visiter ma page Facebook. N’oubliez pas d’y cliquer «Like»Vous pouvez également me trouver sur YouTube. Pour voir mon art, visitez Ericzone Art sur InstagramDeviantartBehance et Artstation. M’avez-vous envoyé une demande de connexion via LinkedIn ?

Ericzone Podcast est disponible sur FacebookBaladoQuebec.com et Apple Podcasts. L’émission est également disponible sur YouTube et Stitcher. Je vous invite à visiter l’album photo du Ericzone Podcast sur Flickr.

http://www.youtube.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.facebook.com/ericzonepodcast
http://www.instagram.com/ericzonecompodcast
http://www.ericzone.com
http://www.ericzone.wordpress.com
http://www.twitter.com/ericzonecom